Joint Replacements, Phantom Limbs and Warning Lights

I work with chronic pain patients quite a bit in the clinic. Using modern neuroscience education and graded motor imagery we are able to cure pain conditions that have been classified as untreatable. I have written previous posts on these topics here and here, and would encourage you to check that out if you are not familiar. Although I like working with chronic pain patients, the majority of people I see are orthopedic patients (knee, back, shoulder etc.).

One particular gentleman came to me a few months ago after undergoing a total knee replacement. His rehabilitation has progressed very well. He has full range of motion and strength, and is back to doing most of his normal activities. However, he has had some lingering pain that continues to limit him. Continue reading

Laughter May Really be the Best Medicine (From 9/12/14)

We have all heard the expression, “laughter is the best medicine.” When I hear this I immediately think of the movie Patch Adams, which is about a physician who works to help children heal, and cope with illness by dressing up as clown, telling jokes, and performing other antics. If you haven’t seen it you can download it from Redbox Instant Video or Vudu. However, I think that “laughter is the best medicine,” is a bold claim. Is there any evidence to suggest that this is true? Continue reading

Concussion (From 8/18/14)

Fall is just around the corner and we are just a week away from the start of school. This means that fall sports are already underway for most schools, and both athletes and fans alike are looking forward to the competition, and rivalry that awaits. As health care professionals we have been preparing the competitors for peak physical performance, and preparing ourselves for the inevitable injuries that will occur. Once again, the injury that most health care providers will be most cautious of is concussion. Concussion has been the hot button topic of the last 5+ years in athletics, and even though the processes and protections for this condition have improved immensely, there is still work to be done. Continue reading